As I Roved Out

Music

sam-amidom-01-screencap-by-pklSam Amidon–As I Roved Out and  Wedding Dress

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Elias Gottlob Haussmann [Public domain], via Wikimedia CommonsThe Best of Bach

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jazz-screencap-by-pklJazz Mix
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Tuesday, 2014 September 16

how-did-we-get-here-screencap-by-pklwe explored how we got here, which ultimately requires an understanding of deep time.

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Wednesday, 2014 September 17

William_Carlos_Williams_passport_photograph_1921Today’s poem, ‘We Shall Be Released’, is *not* about civil rights in the Sixties. Also, the short bio of William Carlos Williams (pictured–born today) is good.

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Stephenfrynightingaleafter the all-candidates (minus ute) meeting, we watched stephen fry’s out there, a global exploration of being gay.

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Thursday, 2014 September 18

gaia-fdn-logoThe Gaia Foundation announces its new report, ‘UnderMining Agriculture: how the extractive industries threaten our food systems [the report, a two-page briefing, and an infographic]. Exploring mining’s destructive impacts on land, water, air and climate- the foundations of agriculture and life itself- the report is a critical insight into an ignored yet critical issue.’

Friday, 2014 September 19

Es Buah 2Poem: Fruit Cocktail in Light Syrup by Amy Gerstler

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riley‘For Thoreau [in the nineteenth century]–as it is for many of us–the nature that is immediately at hand is fascinating enough and worthy of record. But he knew he was witnessing nothing like what people two centuries earlier had seen…. The human mind is not good at registering the loss side of the change ledger. Ecologists call this kind of retrospective amnesia the “shifting baseline syndrome” [where the next generation thinks the loss is normal]…. Thus we manage with good intentions, to draw down our natural capital.’–John Riley, The Once And Future Great Lakes Country.

Saturday, 2014 September 20

vanier-from-jean-vanier.orgAfter visiting Auschwitz, Vanier remarks, ‘Human beings can so easily become caught up in hatred and fear and falsehood, refusing to see and accept our common humanity.’

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rileyRiley, in The Once And Future Great Lakes Country, credits Catharine Parr Traill as an early ecologist. For example, she observed: ‘In nature, there is “change but not loss…. Here lies one of the old giants at our feet [a fallen oak]. The earth has sustained it year after year … through the network of cable-like roots and fibres…. But     ————— while the tree had been receiving, it had also … given back to the earth fresh matter, in the form of leaves, decayed branches and effete bark and fruitful seed.” ‘ Traill is ‘philosophic: “The progress of civilization sweeps the fair ornaments from the soil. What the lover of country loses of the beautiful is gained by the farmer’ “.

Pauline Eccles [CC-BY-SA-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia CommonsHowever, she noted that ‘the settler “wages war against the forest with fire and steel…. There is a sad want of clumps of trees for shade and shelter.” ‘ Though ‘in recent years Ontario public agencies have backed away from their support for conservation and tree planting …, that work remains a matter of deep public commitment, and a growing number of land trusts, fish and wildlife groups, and tree foundations continue it’, in part because of our ecological understanding.

Sunday, 2014 September 21

climate-from-350there are demands for climate action happening all over the world, including barrie and orillia near here, but not right here. rather, it’s as if the world isn’t changing caused by humans, or there isn’t anything we can do about it. well, we chose to stay home and do something, rather than travel and use fossil fuels to get there and back–ironic, isn’t it?–and talk and write about it. later, while it rained, we watched this moving cbc report. (tx, sh)

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Monday, 2014 September 22

faraday-pdThis is fascinating. It begins, ‘It’s the birthday of British chemist and physicist Michael Faraday, born in south London in 1791’. The poem, a modern one about names by Danusha Laméris (who has an unusual first name), is worth reading.

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